December 2009

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"Menemsha Race"

“Menemsha Race”, this is a Large size painting, 26 1/4″x 44″, oil on stretched canvas, unframed. $4250.00 USD

I have been rummaging around in my studio here in Texas preparing for moving and decided to offer a few of my private collection pieces for auction. I just can’t keep so many paintings for myself! I don’t have access to all my records down here, but I believe I painted this piece in 1997/98. I never thought I’d sell it and therefore never wrote anything on the back. It was created with palette knife and thick buttery strokes of paint on top of various flatly painted fields of blue and orange and pink. This tends to give it an impressionistic, pointillistic feel. It’s abstract, but reality based at the same time…

"Honor Guard"

“Honor Guards”, this is a Medium size painting, 18″x 24″, oil on canvas, unframed. $3750.00 USD

Although reworked recently, this medium size painting was created in July, out on location. It was a foggy afternoon/evening. The light source was muted and unchanging. I
was able to work for much more than my 2 hour limit without fear
of losing my initial vision due to shadows moving. I have always
loved to paint tall daylilies and these were as tall as me. I could look
straight at them instead of down upon them, giving me opportunity to put in their landscaped background, the Polly Hill Arboretum

"Menemsha 2006"

“Menemsha 2006″, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8”, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

I almost completed this in 2006, but had to leave before I had finished. I never returned to complete this painting. As I recall I started out at 6 am working on the canvas and continued until close to 11 am. Way too long to tell the light story here. I was able to put myself back into that frame of mind and finalize this in the studio…

"A September Day"

“A September Day”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. $500.00 USD

Today’s cold temperature persuaded me to stay in to paint. I found myself going through my “not quite finished” pile and setting this on my easel to contemplate and then complete. I think I painted this with my friend and sometime painting partner, Cherie, on a property she had access to. If that is so then it was started a year ago September. I am very pleased to be able to complete it now. It is always hard to leave a piece unfinished. Whatever the reason, lack of time, rain moving in, inability to unify the whole, I feel a sense of loss when the piece does not reach completeness. And now I may pat myself on the back and finally say, job well done!

"Bend-in-the Road Beach"

“Bend-in-the-Road Beach”, note: this painting is 9″ x 12″, oil on canvas panel. $1250 USD

Note this is a 9″ x 12″ painting (larger than my normal 6″ x 8″)… This view is from the back of the dunes looking through the cabañas to the east at Chappaquiddick Island. I could not paint this now as they have cut a road through this back side of the dunes. I would be standing on a huge pile of sand looking straight down the road. This is part of the beachsand refilling project. Sand is dredged out of Sengekontacket Pond, behind me, and moved by pipeline to the parking area into piles. Front-end loaders fill dump trucks with sand from the pile. They drive down the temporary road behind the dunes and dump the sand in front of the cabañas a million dollars later. For reference, this is what the view should look like!…

"Squibnocket Valley"

“Squibnocket Valley”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. $500.00 USD

I discovered this view by accident a few evenings ago. It had been very windy with big surf all day. Wandering to a sheltered corner on this property, only visited once before, I came upon this wonderful landscape. If the water were not there, it would be a valley…

"Autumn's Eve"

“Autumn’s Eve”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

This may not look like a protected place from which to paint, but with a West or North wind it is. The sun was dodging in and out of clouds when I arrived. I almost didn’t see this glowing opportunity as it was clouded at first. I like to get out and walk a little to “feel” a vista. I take a few reference photos with my iPhone’s camera. They’re not the best photos, but good for reminders. I had done all this and was about to wander back to my van when I took one last look at the boat. The sun had broken through and the reflection on the boat was stunning…

"December Split Rock"

“December Split Rock”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

I had to follow a small creek out from the woods to the ocean to get to this beach. There wasn’t much breeze. The temperature was a cool 37º F. I was conscious of keeping my boots out of the water. I noticed first deer tracks, then dog tracks and, suddenly, barefeet tracks! I’m not certain they belonged to a swimmer. Definitely didn’t belong to a mermaid. However, there are those who still go in for a quick dip at this time of year…

"Off Season South Beach"

“Off Season South Beach”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

I am really getting into this cold weather painting mode. Once the location is selected, I bundle up to keep myself warm and to cut the winds. I set up quickly and start to paint. The coolness of the air is invigorating. It also causes me to work fast and to access my right brain, my intuitive side. There is no time for analysis, just action. No long drawn out thoughts of “what if…”, just enough time and warmth to do it and go home…

"Salt and Fresh"

“Salt and Fresh”, this is a Small painting, 6″x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

Painting today was short, sweet and quick! It was about 37º f. with a 12 mph wind in my face. I could not have done it without wearing my gloves and snowsuit pants (plus hooded shell, vest and fleece). That makes it a record fall of painting without gloves until Dec. 6th. This time of year the sunsets tend to linger. The sun does not just drop straight down below the horizon as happens around mid summer. It eases over the edge of the earth at an oblique angle to the horizon and not close to 90º as in the summer. This gives us an infinitesimal bit more light and also amplifies the red end of the spectrum. In low light landscape painting, more red is usually a good thing!…

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