February 2013

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"Katama Opening"

“Katama Opening”

“Katama Opening”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

When an opening migrates along the beach to Chappaquiddick, as this one is, it is a sign its cycle is almost over and will soon close. There are long periods of no opening and plus or minus 20 year periods of substantial ones. I have seen 2 of each in my lifetime. Both openings wreaked havoc on the southern most tip of “Chappy”. This last one sliced off cliff and land moving the water’s edge hundreds of feet north. In this painting I am lucky to have found the opening visible from my vantage point…

"Winter Leaves"

“Winter Leaves”

“Winter Leaves”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. $550.00 USD

I can never resist painting this tree behind the dunes every so often. This season it has retained a lot more dried leaves than in years past. As I was packing up in the twilight to leave, I heard and barely saw one of my favorite evening birds, a Common Night Hawk, or Nightjar. There might have been two of them. They are exceptionally well camouflaged when sitting still on the ground. They zoom about sometimes low overhead and let out a nasally call: Peeent, Peeent as they circle around…

"Slow on the Creek"

“Slow on the Creek”

“Slow On The Creek”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. $550.00 USD

The buoy angle let me know it was just around high tide on Menemsha Creek. When the waters rush in or out, the buoy not only is almost submerged by the push on it, but it lists at more than 45º. (I always wonder how much weight is holding it in place on the bottom of the Creek.) As the rain squall moved in I had to totally close my windows to keep dry. The wet brings out color and more contrast in the landscape, just as the gray of the clouds dulls the blue-green of the Creek and forces the any other colors forward. I was especially needing something red to paint in all the rain at the end of this day and the channel marker was just right…

"Winter Field"

“Winter Field”

“Winter Field”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

This view of the Allen Farm, across the field and out to sea, while usually warm and inviting, was today cold and windblown. I stepped out of my vehicle to gather my paints and stepped back in quickly to paint from the warmth of the van. As the shadows of the cedars along the fence line lengthened and finally engulfed the field with blue, I thought about the warmth of summers past, swimming and napping on the distant beach. My daydream collapsed as a car pulled up beside me and Robin jumped out bearing the gift of an unscheduled hot chocolate… Yum!

“Woods Hole”

"Woods Hole"

“Woods Hole”

“Woods Hole”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

I had three location choices for this painting. One required a long walk through woods and maybe snow drifts to arrive at a long beach walk. Two was a short beach walk. Three was possibly traveling down an un-snow-plowed lane and a walk down 5 or 6 stories of beach stairs. I attempted #3 first. The lane was plowed as was the parking lot. Snow on the stairs was almost non existent. I dallied on top taking scouting photos and checking for wind and temperature. Deciding on full winter attire, I returned to my van to gear up. I grabbed the rest of my coffee, a chocolate bite and container of mixed nuts to fuel my furnace as I painted. I descended down the stairs, stopping at each landing for more precision photos of potential views. The last landing was a killer. I was trapped 20 feet above the beach. Winter storms had left only steep, weeping-wet clay between me and the sands below where once was the bottom most set of stairs. I had stepped in clay like that before. Not only is it slippery on an incline, but it sticks to everything it touches like honey, in a bad sort of way. On the beach directly beneath were more boulders at the waters edge casting great, long, blue shadows from the waning sun. I just couldn’t reach them. As I worked, the sun set and lights across the way in Woods Hole slowly flickered on. They were soon followed by the lights of the evening ferryboat chugging into its homeport…

“Snow Fog”

"Snow Fog"

“Snow Fog”

“Snow Fog”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

Meanwhile, with the cold snow cover and warm air above, the landscape view softened from the snow fog. Overhead the gray cloud cover gently misted and rained dictating painting be done from inside my van. Though it was warm enough to create without gloves, the 4 inches of slushy wet snow also made me happy to paint from the driver’s seat…

"Light, Snow, Shadows"

“Light, Snow, Shadows”

“Light, Snow, Shadows”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

After the February storm, the sun came out. It warmed up enough to paint outside without gloves for about an hour before I had to slip them on. The sky was brilliant blue and the snow shadows reflected the blue of space above. It felt great to be out painting in windless winter air…

"Bait Barrels"

“Bait Barrels”

“Bait Barrels”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. This painting has SOLD.

It was cold and blowing outside. I stayed in my van and painted this scene. Just before, my fisherman friend left his vessel and headed home for the day. The harbor remained quiet. As I worked a detail of US Coast Guardsmen and k-9 marched behind me out to their boat for practice maneuvers…

"Between Bridges"

“Between Bridges”

“Between Bridges”, this is a small painting, 6″ x 8″, oil on canvas panel. $550.00 USD

I thought I wouldn’t paint today, as I hadn’t settled on an appropriate view and sun was about down. I had no one behind me when I reached this stretch of road and beach between Oak Bluffs and Edgartown. I slowed way down, stopped, took one photo and turned right around and came back to this vantage point. It is maybe 8 feet more above sea level than any other part along the beach section of the road, and every foot counts when trying to get an over view of Sengekontacket Pond. Even though time was short, I knew I could block this image in and finish from memory back in the studio. And then, suddenly, drama happened! The sky streaked orange and the sun tried to pop out under the cloud bank…